in

Antivegetativa: a ‘submersible’ installation by Davide D’Elia

Taking the passing of time as the theme to his installation, Italian artist Davide D’Elia transformed a Roman gallery into a light blue ship hull. The name and reference to the installation were taken from the ‘antivegetativa’ — an anti-fouling paint used above all on ships and boats to avoid the deterioration of the hull, caused by the growth of sea plants and animals on, such as algae, coral and mold.

More information: Artsy (h/t: Ignant and Exelettrofonica).

Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia
Antivegetativa: a 'submersible' installation by Davide D'Elia

Curated by Leandro Lima

CEO-founder of Visualflood. A Feira de Santana, Brazil-based amateur fine art photographer, among other things, who loves science, nature, visual arts, and has green as his fave color.

Please Login to comment
avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of